Bodiam Castle

Bodiam Castle is a 14th-century moated castle near Robertsbridge in East Sussex, England. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, ostensibly to defend the area against French invasion during the Hundred Years’ War. Of quadrangular plan, Bodiam Castle has no keep, having its various chambers built around the outer defensive walls and inner courts. Its corners and entrance are marked by towers, and topped by crenellations. Its structure, details and situation in an artificial watery landscape indicate that display was an important aspect of the castle’s design as well as defence. It was the home of the Dalyngrigge family and the centre of the manor of Bodiam.
Possession of Bodiam Castle passed through several generations of Dalyngrigges, until their line became extinct, when the castle passed by marriage to the Lewknor family. During the Wars of the Roses, Sir Thomas Lewknor supported the House of Lancaster, and when Richard III of the House of York became king in 1483, a force was despatched to besiege Bodiam Castle. It is unrecorded whether the siege went ahead, but it is thought that Bodiam was surrendered without much resistance. The castle was confiscated, but returned to the Lewknors when Henry VII of the House of Lancaster became king in 1485. Descendants of the Lewknors owned the castle until at least the 16th century.
By the start of the English Civil War in 1641, Bodiam Castle was in the possession of Lord Thanet. He supported the Royalist cause, and sold the castle to help pay fines levied against him by Parliament. The castle was subsequently dismantled, and was left as a picturesque ruin until its purchase by John Fuller in 1829. Under his auspices, the castle was partially restored before being sold to George Cubitt, 1st Baron Ashcombe, and later to Lord Curzon, both of whom undertook further restoration work. The castle is protected as a Grade I listed building and Scheduled Monument. It has been owned by The National Trust since 1925, donated by Lord Curzon on his death, and is open to the public. – after Wikipedia.

Gizycko, Lake Niegocin
Mazury Airshow 2017

Regisgtration Plane type   Regisgtration Plane type
SP-KBA AN-2   SP_SATP Pioneer 300 STD
SP-LOT RWD-5R   SP-SEWA Pioneer 300 STD
SP-ICY Aero AT-3   SP-XESA ZEN1 Gyrocopter
SP-AMI Aero AT-3-R100   G-IIHI Extra 330SC
AP-AAT Aero AT-3 VLA   LY-AKU Yak-50
SP-YYY Yak-18T   LY-ANP Yak-50
SP-YBD TS-8 Bies   LY-AHR Yak-50
SE-CFP DC-3 “Daisy”   SP-SVLE VL3
D-EZUW Extra 300S   SP-SHOO Virus SW
SP-GRY EC 120B Colibri   SP-AYA 300 CBi
PH-RCG Pioneer 400   77 MiG-29A Fulcrum

Port Wieczorek, Lake Niegocin

Lake Niegocin is a lake in the Masurian Lake District of Poland’s Warmia-Mazury Province. It is the seventh largest lake in Poland, with an area of 26.04 square kilometres (10.05 sq mi). Maximum depth is 39.7 metres (130 ft); average is 9.9 metres (32 ft).[1]


Lunch @ the airport

April 2017, Munich Airport, Germany

April 2017, Munich Airport, Germany

On the way to Munich

April 2017, Biberwier, Austria

April 2017, Biberwier, Austria

Solden

Dirt Roads

La Palma

The Angel of the North.

The Angel of the North is a contemporary sculpture, designed by Sir Antony Gormley, located near Gateshead in Tyne and Wear, England. Completed in 1998, it is a steel sculpture of an angel, 20 metres (66 ft) tall, with wings measuring 54 metres (177 ft) across. The wings do not stand straight sideways, but are angled 3.5 degrees forward. Gormley did this to create “a sense of embrace”. It stands on a hill on the southern edge of Low Fell, overlooking the A1 and A167 roads into Tyneside, and the East Coast Main Line rail route, south of the site of Team Colliery.

 

Seahouses

Seahouses is a village on the North Northumberland coast in England. It is about 20 km north of Alnwick, within the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
Seahouses attracts many visitors, mainly from the north east area. However national and international tourists often come to Seahouses whilst visiting the Northumberland National Park, Northumberland Coast and the Farne Islands. Seahouses also has a working fishing port, which also serves the tourist trade, being the embarkation point for visits to the Farne Islands. From shops in the town and booths along the harbour, several boat companies operate, offering various packages which may include inter alia landing on at least one Farne, seeing seals and seabirds, and hearing a commentary on the islands and the Grace Darling story or scuba diving on the many Farnes Islands wrecks.